Uncovering mysteries of the past

Volunteers will be working alongside professionals next week to investigate some of the mysteries of Folkestone's past.

ARCHAEOLOGICAL DIG MAIN AND THUMBNAIL IMAGE

Volunteers will be working alongside professionals next week to investigate some of the mysteries of Folkestone's past.

Members of the Finding Eanswythe project will be carrying out a series of archaeological excavations in Morehall Rec to try to uncover an ancient watercourse that forms part of the legend associated with Eanswythe, Folkestone's patron saint.

The project is supported by Folkestone & Hythe District Council and aims to protect the area's heritage and provide opportunities for local people to get involved and learn more about their history.

Cllr John Collier, Cabinet Member for the District Economy, said it looked set to be a fascinating project.

There are many unanswered questions around St Eanswythe's life and legacy and I am very much looking forward to seeing what is discovered during the excavations. Experts have already discovered hugely valuable relics but there is more to find out, and more we can learn from what could be buried on the site. Cllr John Collier, Cabinet Member for the District Economy

Eanswythe was buried in Folkestone in the seventh century and is believed to have founded the earliest monastic community in England in the Bayle.

According to legend, she diverted water to flow uphill to her convent via an artificial watercourse that was in use until the late 1800s. The project team, led by Canterbury Archaeological Trust, will excavate across the line of the watercourse to see what remains.

Our project will bring specialists and the community together to explore and protect this valuable national heritage, creating opportunities for people to be directly involved and to learn more about their heritage and the many ways it can be better protected and shared. Annie Partridge, from Canterbury Archaeological Trust

Anyone interested in volunteering should email annie.partridge@canterburytrust.co.uk .

People are welcome to visit the dig, from 6 to 14 October, and see what the team have found.

Published on 2 October 2018